Colleagues Remember CIS Professor Ken Carpenter As A Dedicated Teacher With A Passion For Art and Technology

Professor Emeritus Ken Carpenter, who taught Computer Information Systems (CIS) for 26 years at Capital Community College, is being remembered by alumni and colleagues as “an outstanding teacher, mentor and friend.”

Carpenter, 80, died peacefully at his Wethersfield home May 28th.

Professor Emeritus Ken Carpenter

Donations to the Capital Community College Foundation Scholarship Fund are being accepted in his memory at the request of his family.

Recalling Carpenter as her “next door office neighbor” when she started at Capital, Dr. Miah LaPierre-Dreger, Dean of Academic and Student Affairs and a former Chair of Business and Technology Department, says “his passion for teaching, his love for our students, and his ability to view life through the eyes of a cartoonist were evident and inspiring to those around him. It was a privilege to call him a mentor, colleague and friend.”

The current Business and Technology Chair, Seth Freeman, also praised Carpenter as both a mentor and colleague: “I learned a great deal from Ken when I first joined the Business and Technology department as an adjunct and even more when I became full-time. I found Ken to be extremely knowledgeable and always interested in learning new tools and techniques for computer programming and specifically computer animation. Ken was always kind and supportive. He was committed to serving our students and our College.”

Professor Carpenter, an avid gardener, painter and lover of animation, intertwined technology instruction with a passion for art and cartooning. Carpenter’s interests in art and technology influenced and enthused students in CIS outside the classroom. He founded and advised the Animation Club that encouraged members to learn and apply computer graphics in creative ways.

“Good-Hearted College” Ken Carpenter’s painting on the CCC campus.

Upon his retirement in 2012 his colleagues recognized Carpenter for his teaching and collegiality with a plaque and presented a pear tree for planting in his home garden that he and his wife Donna tended and cultivated. Two of Carpenter’s paintings hang outside his old office on the campus’ 6th floor as a reminder of his contributions to the college and its students.

Carpenter, a U.S. Army veteran, grew up in Bridgeport graduating from Central High School. He went on to the University of Bridgeport for undergraduate degrees, master’s and Sixth Year degrees in education. He previously was a teacher at Waltersville and Franklin Schools in Bridgeport before joining the CCC faculty.

Memorial donations in Ken’s name may be made to the Capital Community College Foundation (Scholarship Fund) at 950 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06103,

About @ Capital

A weblog for alumni and friends of Capital Community College, Hartford, Connecticut. Comments and information pertaining to the College are welcome. For more information contact the Office of Institutional Advancement, CCC, 950 Main Street, Hartford, CT 06103. - John McNamara, Editor.
This entry was posted in Business and Technology, In Memoriam, scholarships and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

1 Response to Colleagues Remember CIS Professor Ken Carpenter As A Dedicated Teacher With A Passion For Art and Technology

  1. Doris B Arrington says:

    Ken was a wonderful professor and a good hearted person. We shared growing up in Bridgeport. He went out of his way to assist students. I am fortunate to have one of his pictures that he gave me.
    D

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.