Local History: Hartford’s “Forgotten Legacy” Of Painting And Sculpture Topic At April 26th Public Lecture

“A Forgotten Legacy: The Hartford Art World, 1800-1950” is the topic of  a fourth local history lecture at Capital Community College on Thursday, April 26th.

The lecture, free and open to the public, is the last of four talks in the spring semester in CCC’s inaugural Hartford Studies Public Lecture Series. It will be held at Centinel Hill Hall auditorium at the 950 Main Street campus at 5:30 p.m.

Gary Knoble, an independent scholar and retired insurance executive and consultant, will discuss Hartford as an “important center of activity for painting and sculpture” in the 19th and 20th centuries. His lecture will cover the city’s major arts institutions “that flourished between 1800 and 1950 with images and biographies of the artists involved in those institutions.”

The College’s Hartford Heritage Project and College Foundation are hosting the series on Hartford history as part of Capital’s 50th anniversary commemoration.

Historian and author William Hosley is curating the series for Capital and its Heritage project. Hosley was formerly director of the New Haven Museum and Hartford-based Connecticut Landmarks, where he cared for a chain of house museums, including Hartford’s Butler-McCook and Isham-Terry houses. Prior to that, as a curator and exhibition developer at Wadsworth Atheneum, his Sam & Elizabeth: Legend and Legacy of Colt’s Empire (1996), helped spawn the Coltsville National Park.

Contributions in support of the history series and placed-based learning are welcome through a contribution form, secure online giving or by phone: 860-906-5102. The lecture series is being supported by the College Foundation’s 21st Century Endowment Fund.
For more information Email: CA-foundation@capitalcc.edu

To learn more about the Hartford Heritage Project, visit www.capitalcc.edu/hhp

 

 

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50 Years Ago Today

I remember exactly where I was on April 4, 1968.

That sunny and warm Thursday,  like many others in my senior year in high school, I drove to Bradlee’s Department store on the Lynnway in Lynn, Massachusetts after school to punch in for the evening shift, earning some money before entering Boston University and the College of Basic Studies — BU’s equivalent of the community colleges that were just getting established in that decade.

News spread quickly into the evening that the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. was dead at the age of 39.

It didn’t take long to realize that my shift as a retail clerk would be different from all the others. The store quickly emptied out. Not a customer in sight all night. No need for Mr. Silverman, the shaken and somber store manager, to send me out on outside carriage control. The bullets in Memphis were enough to bring a normal business day to a halt in Lynn and most of the nation as big cities teetered on the brink of a violence that King sought to avoid with acts of non-violent resistance.

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New Britain’s Memorial at MLK Park.

Just five short years before I had come home from junior high on a late summer day to watch King deliver his “I Have A Dream” speech – an event that would inspire so many of us to become community and political activists.

There are many good remembrances of what King said and stood for on his national holiday and at the permanent memorial in Washington every year.

But the nation could stand to be reminded again of the day King was killed and why he was in Memphis a few years after the Voting Rights and Civil Rights Acts became the law of the land.

By 1968, Rev. King was widening the concerns of his movement. In Where Do We Go From Here?  King, much to the consternation of the more cautious members of his movement and the political establishment, opposed a Vietnam policy that had begun to break the nation further apart. The lunchroom sit-ins and battles over accommodations and voting rights were giving way to a broader agenda. He was planning a new march on Washington – “the Poor People’s Campaign” — when he decided to take up the cause of 1,300 Black sanitation workers in Memphis, a city of southern segregation, where the white power structure opposed the right to unionize and the Mayor vowed never to bargain in good faith in a way that would give the sanitation workers their dignity. The strike and a citywide economic boycott were a cause King knew he could not ignore.

King’s “I’ve Been to the Mountain Top” speech (“I may not get there with you”) on the eve of the assassination is his best known from Memphis. But two weeks earlier, on March 18th, King galvanized support for strikers by saying: “So often we overlook the worth and significance of those who are not in professional jobs, or those who are not in the so-called big jobs…..One day our society will come to respect the sanitation worker if it is to survive.” Following King’s assassination, the Memphis power structure gave up its intransigence – recognizing the union, awarding pay raises and instituting merit promotions.

Fifty years later Rev. King’s  work goes on and is being renewed for a new generation. Led by the Rev. William Barber of North Carolina and others a “moral direct action” campaign is mobilizing a 2018 Poor People’s Campaign  for the same principles  that led Rev. King to Memphis and his last days.

King’s campaign for striking AFSCME sanitation workers reaffirmed his greatness at the hour of his death and resonates today in the cause of social and economic justice. That’s why I’ll always remember 4/4/68 as a day frozen in time not to be forgotten.

— John McNamara

Updated from a 2007 Post

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Capital CC Goes To The State Capitol: 50th Anniversary Display At LOB Week of March 19th

Informational tables to mark  Capital Community College’s (CCC) 50th anniversary  and its programs and initiatives will be on display at the State Capitol’s Legislative Office Building (LOB) during the week of March 19th.
The “50 Years of Creating Access and Changing Lives”  display at the LOB Concourse, 300 Capitol Avenue will share highlights of Capital’s accomplishments since it opened in 1967 as Greater Hartford Community College. The history also includes recognition of Hartford State Technical College which was consolidated with Capital in 1990.  CCC tables will  showcase current programs such as the Hartford Heritage Project and student success stories.  The display will be open to the public from March 19th through March 23rd except for Wednesday March 21st from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
 The LOB exhibit is part of events and activities during the 2017-2018 academic year to communicate the value of Capital’s mission and honor the accomplishments of faculty, staff, alumni and students.  In May an anniversary luncheon will be held for faculty emeriti and retirees (May 17) and an Alumni Hall of Fame program and reception (May 22) will be held at the 950 Main Street campus.
For information contact the Advancement office at 860-906-5102; e-mail CA-foundation@capitalcc.edu
 
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Local History: Philanthropy, 19th Century Hartford Are Topics At Capital Community College Public Lecture March 22nd

Trinity College’s Andrew Walsh, Ph.D, will present an illustrated lecture entitled “‘For Our City’s Welfare’ : Protestants, Philanthropy and the Contest Over Local Identity in 19th Century Hartford” on Thursday, March 22nd, at Capital Community College (CCC).

The lecture, open to the public,  is the third in CCC’s inaugural Hartford Studies Public Lecture Series. It will be held at Centinel Hill Hall auditorium at the 950 Main Street campus at 5:30 p.m.

Dr. Walsh, Associate Director of the Leonard E. Greenberg Center for the Study of Religion in Public Life at Trinity,  has written and published extensively on religion, public life and Hartford history. He is co-editor of of the Center’s book series, The Future of Religion in America, to be published by Columbia University Press.

The College’s Hartford Heritage Project and College Foundation are hosting the series on Hartford history as part of  Capital’s 50th anniversary commemoration.

Historian and author William Hosley is curating the series for Capital and its Heritage project.  Hosley was formerly director of the New Haven Museum and Hartford-based Connecticut Landmarks, where he cared for a chain of  house museums, including Hartford’s Butler-McCook and Isham-Terry houses. Prior to that, as a curator and exhibition developer at Wadsworth Atheneum, his Sam & Elizabeth: Legend and Legacy of Colt’s Empire (1996), helped spawn the Coltsville National Park.

Contributions in support of the history series and placed-based learning are welcome through a contribution form, secure online giving or by phone: 860-906-5102. The lecture series is being supported by the College Foundation’s 21st Century Endowment Fund.

For more information Email: CA-foundation@capitalcc.edu

 To learn more about the Hartford Heritage Project, visit www.capitalcc.edu/hhp

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Wednesday (3/7) Town & Legislative Lunch Forum at Capital Community College Postponed

The Town and Legislative Lunch Forum scheduled for Wednesday, March 7th at Capital Community College has been postponed because of expected inclement weather. The forum will be re-scheduled.

For more Information contact the Office of Institutional Advancement   Email: CA-Foundation@capitalcc.edu

Telephone 860-906-5102

 

 

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Town & Legislative Forum To Be Held At Capital’s Downtown Campus Wednesday, March 7th

The Capital Community College Foundation & Advisory Council will host a Town and Legislative Forum on Wednesday March 7th from 12 to 1:30 p.m. at the campus’ Walter J. Markiewicz Community Room, 950 Main Street in downtown Hartford.

State legislators in Capital Community College’s  primary service area, officials from Hartford and surrounding towns and community partners have been invited.

Policies and legislation impacting Capital CC will be discussed including the plan for the proposed  consolidation of  community colleges and new proposals to make student financial aid more accessible.  Lawmakers have introduced bills before the Higher Education and Employment Advancement Committee that call for “tuition free community college.”

Shared will be  initiatives for workforce development and place-based learning:

  • The nationally recognized  insurance apprenticeship program   launched in 2017  with The Hartford offers an insurance-specific curriculum, paid-on-the-job training, tuition assistance and mentoring to equip students for key customer-facing roles in The Hartford’s claims operation.  The program is creating career track opportunities for Capital students.
  • The success of Capital’s Hartford Heritage Project that since 2011 has made Hartford’s rich and diverse cultural institutions, landmarks, and neighborhoods an extension of classroom incorporating content about Hartford into the curriculum.

Seating is limited for the Town & Legislative forum. RSVPs are required for this event. For more information contact the college’s advancement office at 860-906-5102 or email  CA-foundation@capitalcc.edu.

The Connecticut General Assembly opened for the 2017 session on February 7th and will adjourn on May 9th. To contact your legislators visit the Connecticut General Assembly

Capital Community College, located in the center of Hartford in the renovated, historic G. Fox building, is a public, open-door, educational institution committed to the metropolitan community it serves. Its mission is to provide higher education and lifelong learning to people of diverse cultures, abilities and ages, and to serve the needs of the community, government agencies and business and industry. To learn more about the college, visit www.capitalcc.edu

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College Presents Black History Talk in New Lecture Series

In 2010, Capital Community College established the Hartford Heritage Project (HHP), the first place-based curriculum at a Connecticut college or university.  The HHP connects course content to the world class art, history, and theaters at the college’s doorstep.

This year, Capital launched The Hartford Studies Public Lecture Series, envisioned to underscore the importance of Hartford’s history and rich cultural resources.

Thursday, February 22nd at 5:30 pm, historian and preservationist William Hosley will present Black History is American (& Local) History, A Travelogue, the second lecture of the new series. A generation ago people of African descent were almost invisible in the day-to-day experience of American history museums, including southern plantations where enslaved people did most of the work and were the majority of the population. A lot has changed. This program will explore African American stories by taking you on a journey of discovery to southern plantations and Civil Right museums of astonishing reach and ambition in Atlanta, Memphis, Charleston, Birmingham, Baltimore, and Detroit. It will also suggest a path forward for Hartford’s black history.

“I love presenting and promoting Connecticut’s heritage,” says Hosley. “If we don’t teach our children to know and care for this place, we will lose things worth cherishing and they will miss discovering the small and large wonders in their own backyards.”

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Black History is American (& Local) History, A Travelogue will take place Thursday, February 22nd at 5:30 pm, Capital Community College, 950 Main St, Hartford, Degnan Hall, Room 1126. Refreshments will be served; validated parking in Morgan St Garage. For more information contact

CA-Foundation@capitalcc.edu or 860-906-5102.  To learn more about the Hartford Heritage Project, visit www.capitalcc.edu/hhp

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